Currently boasting the highest GDP per capita in the world, Luxembourg is an attractive destination for people looking to work abroad. The country’s economy is thriving, and the active and dynamic labour market is a major drawcard for expats. Tax exemptions afforded to certain expats are another bonus of working in Luxembourg.

With strict labour laws in place, expats working in Luxembourg will also enjoy a good work-life balance and high average salaries.


Job market in Luxembourg

At the heart of Luxembourg’s economy are agriculture and financial services. Manufacturing and steel production are also large industries and, in recent years, the economy has further diversified and now boasts thriving high-tech- and telecommunications sectors. 

With a low unemployment rate and a highly-skilled population, expats will discover that skills shortages are not common in Luxembourg. That said, expats with the right credentials are most likely to find vacancies in the finance, healthcare, retail, manufacturing, construction and hospitality industries. The trade, transport, telecommunications and IT sectors are also big employers and expats may have some luck here too.


Finding a job in Luxembourg

Those with the right skills shouldn’t struggle too much to find a job in Luxembourg. Once expats have acquired a residence visa and a social security number for Luxembourg, they can register with the Agency for the Development of Employment (ADEM). The ADEM will assist expats with finding a job in the country, provided they meet certain requirements.

Those looking to move to Luxembourg for work who don’t meet the requirements should consider applying with local recruitment agencies. Searching online job portals and in local newspapers for vacancies is also an option, but the assistance of a recruiter could prove more fruitful.

Speaking a local language will be highly beneficial for expats looking for a job, as English is rarely spoken in business in Luxembourg. 


Work culture in Luxembourg

The workplace in Luxembourg is generally formal and hierarchical. Expats should dress conservatively and formally for work. Punctuality and deadlines are taken seriously, and business meetings are generally held to formalise decisions that have already been made and therefore tend to be brief.

Luxembourg has strict labour laws in place to protect employees, meaning most people have a good work-life balance and are paid well. The working week is 40 hours, starting at 8am or 9am and ending at 5pm or 6pm, five days a week. Many companies have flexible hours though, meaning employees can arrange their work hours to suit them. Full-time employees are entitled to a minimum of 25 days of leave a year, excluding the 10 annual public holidays. This may differ for fixed-term or part-time employees, however.