With a legacy of coal mining and shipping, Cardiff has been the powerhouse of the Welsh economy for centuries. Though the city has moved on from these once-prosperous industries, Cardiff remains the country's top earner, drawing workers from across Wales, the UK and the world over.


Job market in Cardiff

With an average of 21 million visitors a year, it's safe to say that tourism in Cardiff is booming. Although travel restrictions and closure of attractions during the Covid-19 pandemic caused a predictable dip, as it did worldwide, the industry is recovering well and tourists are once again visiting Cardiff, bringing their hard-earned cash with them and creating work for industry professionals.

Service-related industries, such as retail and finance, are also big business in Cardiff, providing a significant percentage of the population with employment. Manufacturing, mostly of pharmaceuticals, is also a thriving industry, as is television, media and filmmaking.


Work culture in Cardiff

Newcomers to Cardiff are often attracted to the lifestyle that comes with working here. In general, Welsh employers tend to have policies that encourage good life-work balance. This can include benefits such as shorter working hours and more holiday time, though this varies from company to company.

Another upside is the short duration of the typical commute into Cardiff, and with the ocean on one side of the city and a national park on the other, most people enjoy a scenic commute.

It's well known that the Welsh are a rather friendly bunch, and Cardiff is no different. Newcomers can expect colleagues to be welcoming.

It shouldn't take too long for new arrivals to settle in and find their bearings – though the city centre is busy, it's compact and easily navigable.